I started my career as a photographer and in all its variations, photography is at the core of most of my projects.
My photographic preferences vary, so does the media revealing the final image; print or the web.
On this page, you will find links to some of my editorial work; images I published either in magazines or books.

Recently, I've been asked to teach photography and photographic editing; you can find more information about it on the Manuel Bruges Classes page, or if you prefer, you might contact me using the Manuel Bruges Contact page.

I started my career as a photographer and in all its variations, photography is at the core of most of my projects.
My photographic preferences vary, so does the media revealing the final image; print or the web.
On this page, you will find links to some of my editorial work; images I published either in magazines or books.

Recently, I've been asked to teach photography and photographic editing; you can find more information about it on the Manuel Bruges Classes page, or if you prefer, you might contact me using the Manuel Bruges Contact page.

Gilles Sacksick portrait

Portrait Photography

Photography of people can be broken down into numerous categories. However, most photographers divide it into two groups; the candid, and the portrait and either of them can possess images gotten with, or without, the subject's awareness.
Portrait photography, likewise, is often further divided into various subgroups; classic, environmental, glamor, lifestyle, surreal, conceptual...
Personally, I like to simplify and call my images of people Portraits and divide them into two groups; Classic and Informal.
There are countless of elements necessary to create a compelling Portrait, and they vary wildly from picture to picture. However, two seem to remain constant; technique and composition.
Those two elements are what convey the subject's feeling and for that reason, I consider them, not the camera, my tools of communication.

On my Portraits, I like to have the subject's full attention and have him as the largest part of the image frame. That is one of the reasons I tend to get physically close to my subject. The shorter the distance between me and my subject, the more intimate the relationship.
As I get closer to the subject and gradually invade his private space, tension is built. That tension might be unconscious, but the outcome is an inevitable automatic guard.
It is during that brief protective moment that the subject forgets other aspects of their personality and reveals himself.
The subject might be looking straight into my camera lens; he knows that I am taking his portrait. However, it is that brief moment, when he forgets the pose to guard himself, that I want to capture.
It is that subtle tension that allows me to reveal the hidden and deeper part of my subjects.

Kamakura Hachimangu Wedding Ceremony

Promotional Photography

I call Promotional Photography the type of assignments I get to promote a particular product or destination.
This kind of photography differs from travel because my job is to stay within the beaten track and capture landmarks easily recognizable by anyone.
This type of assignments are often requests from town organizations or travel agencies in need of new material to entice consumers.

At first, this kind of photography might seem easy, with no room for improvisation or alternative paths to explore. However, the photographer needs to return with images that are tempting and make the viewer believe that to go there is an achievement; to experience firsthand a natural or human-made landmark in ways previously unavailable to others.

To turn the mundane into something special is the goal of Promotional Photography.
This type of photography is unappealing to the proud and inexperienced photographer. Personally, I like it very much, as it gives me the chance to revisit destinations and witness how much they changed from my last visit.

It is easy to travel to an exotic destination and return with pictures that impress those unfamiliar with the location. However, to create a new face on an easily recognizable destination is one of the greatest challenges a photographer can take.

Gilles Sacksick portrait

Portrait Photography

Photography of people can be broken down into numerous categories. However, most photographers divide it into two groups; the candid, and the portrait and either of them can possess images gotten with, or without, the subject's awareness.
Portrait photography, likewise, is often further divided into various subgroups; classic, environmental, glamor, lifestyle, surreal, conceptual...
Personally, I like to simplify and call my images of people Portraits and divide them into two groups; Classic and Informal.
There are countless of elements necessary to create a compelling Portrait, and they vary wildly from picture to picture. However, two seem to remain constant; technique and composition.
Those two elements are what convey the subject's feeling and for that reason, I consider them, not the camera, my tools of communication.

On my Portraits, I like to have the subject's full attention and have him as the largest part of the image frame. That is one of the reasons I tend to get physically close to my subject. The shorter the distance between me and my subject, the more intimate the relationship.
As I get closer to the subject and gradually invade his private space, tension is built. That tension might be unconscious, but the outcome is an inevitable automatic guard.
It is during that brief protective moment that the subject forgets other aspects of their personality and reveals himself.
The subject might be looking straight into my camera lens; he knows that I am taking his portrait. However, it is that brief moment, when he forgets the pose to guard himself, that I want to capture.
It is that subtle tension that allows me to reveal the hidden and deeper part of my subjects.

Kamakura Hachimangu Wedding Ceremony

Promotional Photography

I call Promotional Photography the type of assignments I get to promote a particular product or destination.
This kind of photography differs from travel because my job is to stay within the beaten track and capture landmarks easily recognizable by anyone.
This type of assignments are often requests from town organizations or travel agencies in need of new material to entice consumers.

At first, this kind of photography might seem easy, with no room for improvisation or alternative paths to explore. However, the photographer needs to return with images that are tempting and make the viewer believe that to go there is an achievement; to experience firsthand a natural or human-made landmark in ways previously unavailable to others.

To turn the mundane into something special is the goal of Promotional Photography.
This type of photography is unappealing to the proud and inexperienced photographer. Personally, I like it very much, as it gives me the chance to revisit destinations and witness how much they changed from my last visit.

It is easy to travel to an exotic destination and return with pictures that impress those unfamiliar with the location. However, to create a new face on an easily recognizable destination is one of the greatest challenges a photographer can take.

Persepolis entrance

Travel Photography

Travel Photography can be divided into various subcategories; landscape documentation, customs, history, people... However, the most popular are the commercial type we often see on magazines enticing us to travel.

Travel Photography encompasses a little of all the other photographic genres, often under uncontrolled light and unpredictable conditions. When compared with other photographic genres, the challenges a Travel Photographer faces are great. However, Travel Photography is highly underestimated and often less profitable. Personally, is one of my favorites.

I often have the chance to take full responsibility for the complete process of the story, from concept to delivery, which allows me great freedom to produce a feature that perfect fits my personality. However, freedom does not mean I can do whatever I want.
On accepting a Travel assignment, I immediately began by study the magazine, review past issues, learn about gender and age group, readers' average income...

The more we know about the magazine target, the better and easier to lay down an action plan. Only then do I start to enquire about the destination and make contacts.

Motorcycle portrait

Urban Adventures

Once I read an interview praising Ginger Rogers, after all, she did all that Fred Astaire did but on high heels.
Somehow I always feel like Ginger when I embark on Photographic Adventures. Likewise, I have to do the same as everyone else with far more experience than myself, but with one or two cameras strapped to my shoulder and a backpack.
Yes, I often fall. Yes, I often feel that I am a fool. Yes, I worry to break my cameras. Even so, I enjoy it and keep doing it.
The foolish feeling seems to be a constant in my photographic career.
I am a regular person and naturally have a few fears; one of them is of heights.
The first time a hotel director asked me to take pictures of his resort from the air I wondered how to escape from such a request. However, the director had already reserved a small airplane, and all was ready.
The aircraft was old; after a few false starts, the pilot had to change the battery because the previous wasn't working. My side-door was dismantled to provide my unrestricted underneath view.
Of course, my mind was racing faster than the airplane and on reaching the destination, I leaned forward and almost flew away with the wind. Luckily, I had a strong and well-set seatbelt.
It was a hot summer day, but at high altitude, it was terrible cold. I no longer knew if the trembling was from cold or fear. However, and as always happens with me, when I brought my camera to eye level my mind become calm, and all doubts vanished.

Persepolis entrance

Travel Photography

Travel Photography can be divided into various subcategories; landscape documentation, customs, history, people... However, the most popular are the commercial type we often see on magazines enticing us to travel.

Travel Photography encompasses a little of all the other photographic genres, often under uncontrolled light and unpredictable conditions. When compared with other photographic genres, the challenges a Travel Photographer faces are great. However, Travel Photography is highly underestimated and often less profitable. Personally, is one of my favorites.

I often have the chance to take full responsibility for the complete process of the story, from concept to delivery, which allows me great freedom to produce a feature that perfect fits my personality. However, freedom does not mean I can do whatever I want.
On accepting a Travel assignment, I immediately began by study the magazine, review past issues, learn about gender and age group, readers' average income...

The more we know about the magazine target, the better and easier to lay down an action plan. Only then do I start to enquire about the destination and make contacts.

Motorcycle portrait

Urban Adventures

Once I read an interview praising Ginger Rogers, after all, she did all that Fred Astaire did but on high heels.
Somehow I always feel like Ginger when I embark on Photographic Adventures. Likewise, I have to do the same as everyone else with far more experience than myself, but with one or two cameras strapped to my shoulder and a backpack.
Yes, I often fall. Yes, I often feel that I am a fool. Yes, I worry to break my cameras. Even so, I enjoy it and keep doing it.
The foolish feeling seems to be a constant in my photographic career.
I am a regular person and naturally have a few fears; one of them is of heights.
The first time a hotel director asked me to take pictures of his resort from the air I wondered how to escape from such a request. However, the director had already reserved a small airplane, and all was ready.
The aircraft was old; after a few false starts, the pilot had to change the battery because the previous wasn't working. My side-door was dismantled to provide my unrestricted underneath view.
Of course, my mind was racing faster than the airplane ever did and on reaching the destination, I leaned forward and almost flew away with the wind. Luckily, I had a strong and well-set seatbelt.
It was a hot summer day, but at high altitude, it was terrible cold. I no longer knew if the trembling was from cold or fear. However, and as always happens with me, when I brought my camera to eye level my mind become calm, and all doubts vanished.

Santorini wedding selfie

Blog

If you want me to blog about a particular theme related to something you found on the pages of this Manuel Bruges web-portfolio, please don't hesitate in contacting me.
I will do my best to turn your request into a public conversation.

Manuel Bruges Blog coming soon.

Client

Clients come in a variety of colours and shapes, and each of their requests varies from the next. However, our desire to satisfactorily please each of their solicitations should remain constant. Constant, too, should be the quality and timing of our deliveries.

Prague wedding portrait

Classes - The Creative Professional

For the past 25 years, I've been working as a freelance Creative Professional and often as a travel journalist. Along the way, I meet many people, who happily showed me their favourite places, told me their best stories, and above all, shared friendship. Without them my work was meaningless.
Today I am gradually trading the road for a more sedentary way of work. However, the passion is still alive and burning within.
After so many adventures, I acquired an experience that seems useful to those interested and for that reason started coaching.
I am not a formal teacher. I am just a friend willing to share some of my experience with anyone interested.
Please take a look at this Manuel Bruges web-portfolio to judge my experience and how useful can it be to you.

My primary interest is to coach privately, as it allows me to target the particular needs of those interested. Sporadically, I give group workshops where I often use practical assignments to be completed by the end of the class.
While private meetings might be more intense and to the point, group classes have the added benefit to bring together students sharing same interests and concerns.
For further questions please contact Manuel Bruges.
For the past 25 years, I've been working as a freelance Creative Professional and often as a travel journalist. Along the way, I meet many people, who happily showed me their favourite places, told me their best stories, and above all, shared friendship. Without them my work was meaningless.
Today I am gradually trading the road for a more sedentary way of work. However, the passion is still alive and burning within.
After so many adventures, I acquired an experience that seems useful to those interested and for that reason started coaching.
I am not a formal teacher. I am just a friend willing to share some of my experience with anyone interested.
Please take a look at this Manuel Bruges web-portfolio to judge my experience and how useful can it be to you.

My primary interest is to coach privately, as it allows me to target the particular needs of those interested. Sporadically, I give group workshops where I often use practical assignments to be completed by the end of the class.
While private meetings might be more intense and to the point, group classes have the added benefit to bring together students sharing same interests and concerns.
For further questions please contact Manuel Bruges.
Fujiya Hotel in Hakone

Digital Workflow

Capturing images is one thing, keeping them organized and ready to be used at short notice, is an entirely different aspect.
A hands-on introduction to photography on the digital age; learn how to create catalogs by placing particular emphasis on techniques that enhance the relationship between sequences to facilitate the speed and simplify the workflow. Add keywords to aid searches, smart albums to automatize display, as well as learn how to backup your images and protect against data loss…

Camera Basics

Demystifying the camera is the first step in the beginners' class.
In this course, you will learn how to use the camera's main settings and functions.
The student will learn the basic presets, practice effective framing in a variety of different light situations and will be taught the basis of correct exposure, white balance, and depth of field, to create the best possible image.

Studio Lighting

Introduction to studio lights; portrait and still-life.
Using softbox, grids, and umbrellas, learn how to manipulate artificial light to achieve the desired effect…

Analogue Photography

Rediscover the magic of B&W film photography using a variety of camera sizes.
Learn to measure light for the different film types and how to develop your own film…

The Portfolio

How to create a solid portfolio that attracts clients is one of the most critical and often overlooked aspects of freelance photography.
Learn how to use your portfolio to target particular customers, by choosing and arranging your images in a well-thought sequence to provide the strongest impact…

Fujiya Hotel in Hakone

Digital Workflow

Capturing images is one thing, keeping them organized and ready to be used at short notice, is an entirely different aspect.
A hands-on introduction to photography on the digital age; learn how to create catalogs by placing particular emphasis on techniques that enhance the relationship between sequences to facilitate the speed and simplify the workflow. Add keywords to aid searches, smart albums to automatize display, as well as learn how to backup your images and protect against data loss…

Camera Basics

Demystifying the camera is the first step in the beginners' class.
In this course, you will learn how to use the camera's main settings and functions.
The student will learn the basic presets, practice effective framing in a variety of different light situations and will be taught the basis of correct exposure, white balance, and depth of field, to create the best possible image.

Studio Lighting

Introduction to studio lights; portrait and still-life.
Using softbox, grids, and umbrellas, learn how to manipulate artificial light to achieve the desired effect…

Analogue Photography

Rediscover the magic of B&W film photography using a variety of camera sizes.
Learn to measure light for the different film types and how to develop your own film…

The Portfolio

How to create a solid portfolio that attracts clients is one of the most critical and often overlooked aspects of freelance photography.
Learn how to use your portfolio to target particular customers, by choosing and arranging your images in a well-thought sequence to provide the strongest impact…